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foothill  towns

Anderson, SC

Chimney Rock, NC

Clemson, SC

Columbus, NC

Gaffney, SC

Greenville, SC

Hickory, NC

Lake Lure &
Rutherford County, NC


Morganton, NC

Mount Airy, NC

Saluda, NC

Seneca, SC

Spartanburg, SC

Tryon, NC

Very Surry, NC

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Center for Carolina Living Behold the mountains’ majesty. Caesar’s Head State Park, in Greenville County, is a favorite for camping, hiking, picnicing, trout fishing and gazing upon the Blue Ridge Escarpment. Winged creatures love it, too. Each fall thousands of migrating hawks make a stop on their way south for the winter. Plan your stop, soon.
SC Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism
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greenville
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Center for Carolina Living Made for meandering. Greenville's Falls Park winds its way among meadows and the Reedy River, providing plenty of niches for romance and family fun. Wander across the Liberty Bridge for a great view.
Photo courtesy of Greenville Convention & Visitors Bureau
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Center for Carolina Living Stroll and loll. Greenville's Main Street invites leisurely window-shopping and al-fresco dining. The area's large European and Asian populations are reflected in numerous ethnic restaurants. Here, a scene from Trio ­ A Brick Oven Café.
Photo by Tony Smith www.tonysmithphotography.com
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Center for Carolina Living April in Paris? Baloney. Try April in Greenville, when the dogwoods bloom and the crowds come out for the Artisphere festival. A blues café provides down-home music and food, and children enjoy their own activities.
Photo by Tony Smith www.tonysmithphotography.com
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Center for Carolina Living Everyone needs a break, and Greenville has more than its share of bistros, outdoor cafes, and unique watering holes. Make mine with a twist, please.
Photo courtesy of Greenville Convention & Visitors Bureau
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Center for Carolina Living Don't work too hard. The trail to Twin Falls, near Greenville, won't strain your muscles, but will give your eyes a workout. Locals say it's worth the trip.
Photo courtesy of Greenville Convention & Visitors Bureau
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Center for Carolina Living They're outside the box. Artisphere, Greenville's successful arts festival, draws visual and performing artists from several states and overseas. More than 100 artists show and sell their work at indoor and outdoor venues downtown.
Photo by Tony Smith www.tonysmithphotography.com
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Center for Carolina Living Greenville Pop.:
56,676

Greenville County Pop.: 407,383
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Center for Carolina Living Greenville Chamber
336.728.9200
www.greenvillechamber.org

City of Greenville
www.greenvillesc.gov

Greenville Web Directory
www.greatergreenville.com
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Heartlands
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GREENVILLE, SC

Greenville ROAD trip

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
interesting insights

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ammy Campbell believes in following her dream. In fact, she followed that dream all the way from her home town of Indianapolis, to Vermont, Africa, Washington, Minnesota, Iowa, the mountains of Bolivia, back to Indianapolis, and eventually settled in Greenville, South Carolina.

Her early educational and career experiences paved the way to her current position as executive director of Rolling Green Village (RGV), a large and gracious, multi-faceted retirement community.

She was a student at the University of Vermont and had no idea what she would do upon graduation, but leaned toward helping the aging population.

 In the back of her mind, though, she dreamed of joining the Peace Corps or doing mission work in the Third World, helping in some humanitarian capacity.

In the back of her mind, though, she dreamed of joining the Peace Corps or doing mission work in the Third World, helping in some humanitarian capacity.

When the opportunity opened up with Life Care Services, RGV’s management company, she joined the thousands of newcomers now calling Greenville “home” because of the expanding white-collar job market.

Although Greenville was once known as the textile capital of the world, that’s no longer true. It has transitioned from a mill village labor force to a city with international flavor, in terms of residents, jobs, festivals, special schools (French and German), culture and cuisine.

Michelin Tire Company was the first major international business to establish its American headquarters in Greenville, and close on its heels was Bavarian automaker BMW.

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Jackson County - Cashiers, NC

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To support the thriving automotive industry, many other out-of-state and international companies have located nearby, thus creating a whole new concept in automotive supply and manufacturing while boosting the total labor force to approximately 200,000.

Some people just have to buck the trends. “Most people retire and move to Florida,” says Fran Giese, chuckling. “My husband, Larry, and I did just the opposite.”

The Clearwater residents chose the Blue Ridge city of Greenville, not far from Mrs. Giese’s childhood home of Pickens. Mr. Giese, a Chicago native who’d lived in Florida most of his life, longed for four seasons, a cooler climate, and topography that wasn’t so flat. “I was tired of walking outside in an oven,” he says. “After 20 years of coming here to visit, I thought I’d like to live here.”

His wife still has close family in the area, so their retirement has been more of a homecoming. But Greenville’s not the place it was when she left 32 years ago. Greenville today simmers with international commerce and higher education. Furman University is here, as well as a technical college.

In addition to nearby college teams, Greenville has sports of its own. The Greenville Drive plays baseball in West End Field in Downtown’s West End.

Named for the regional supermarket enterprise that helped get it built, the BI-LO Center is one of South Carolina’s largest indoor sports and entertainment complexes. Concerts are held here, too: Rod Stewart, Shania Twain and Tony Bennett are just a few recent headliners.

Greenville’s Main Street is the envy of many Southern cities. It’s a leafy, lengthy stroll that affords the pedestrian a variety of experiences. Step into the historic Poinsett Hotel, exquisitely restored into a Westin property.

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Center for Carolina Living Pop into a high-end boutique or one of several interesting cafes. No less than 142 retail stores and 85 restaurants and nightclubs draw locals and traveling business executives.
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“Despite its growth, housing remains affordable,” says Dan Joyner, president of Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. REALTORS®. “In just about every publication we see, Greenville is listed as one of the top 10 quality-of-life areas in the nation,” he said. “And yet, housing is considerably lower than housing in Charlotte or Atlanta.”

The Peace Center for the Performing Arts is a $42 million dollar complex whose Concert Hall is acknowledged to be one of the finest performance facilities in the Southeast. Broadway comes to Greenville quite regularly now, attracting area theater-lovers.

Meanwhile, the Greenville County Museum of Art is home to extensive collections of America’s foremost living artists — Andrew Wyeth and Jasper Johns – all available to the public at no charge. The Governor’s School for Arts & Humanities educates the state’s brightest high school juniors and seniors, many of whom recently have been accepted into the prestigious Julliard School. And, South Carolina’s oldest symphony is still in fine fiddle after 50-some years.
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Center for Carolina Living The Gieses are happy they’re here. So is Fifi, their poodle. And their best friends from Florida have sold their home and arrived, as well.
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Because of its growth and diversity, Greenville is often described as the economic engine that is driving the entire state. In fact, it is the public and private sectors working hand in hand that have helped to position the area as the “incubator” for a great economic future.

Anchoring the CU-ICAR campus will be the Carroll A. Campbell Jr. Graduate Engineering Center, named for the late governor whose leadership helped create an automotive industry cluster by bringing BMW to South Carolina a decade ago.

The adjoining mixed-use acreage, known as Millennium Campus, has attractive, landscaped business sites mingled among biking trails, stone bridges and walkways. High technology, biotechnology, nanotechnology, pharmaceutical and life science companies will be clustered together in an atmosphere in which each will share their expertise. There will be homes, restaurants, medical offices, all with a European design.
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Center for Carolina Living Don’t assume that Greenville is all work and no play. Quite the contrary. Center for Carolina Living
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A stroll down Main Street is an experience in itself. Banks, art galleries, retail stores and professional offices are plentiful. Restaurants cater to every ethnic group in the now-international city. In fact, Greenville even has one five-star restaurant that draws diners from as far away as California on an occasional basis. Combine the walk from North Main southward to visit the historical West End District and Reedy River Park and it becomes obvious the city is on the move!

South Main is home to another public-private partnership, The Peace Center for the Performing Arts, a multi-million dollar venue that draws touring Broadway theatre, musical performances and well-known stars.

As part of the area’s revitalization efforts, a traffic bridge was demolished to make way for the Liberty Bridge, a suspension, pedestrian bridge high above Reedy River Falls, where the city was born. .
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Center for Carolina Living The Falls is one of only a handful of natural falls in downtown cities in the United States Center for Carolina Living
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The entire Greater Greenville area (Greer, Simpsonville, Mauldin, Fountain Inn and Travelers Rest) adds an additional 60,000 in population to the 56,000 residents within Greenville’s city limits, and that is expected to grow. Famed golfer Gary Player has announced he will move his family and entire business to the prestigious Cliffs Golfing Community, north of the city, where he plans to become a permanent resident.

Like that golfing great, newcomers Gary and Susan Cohen were lured by the city’s ambience and phenomenal growth. The couple, and 11-year-old son, Brad, moved from Myrtle Beach to Greenville on New Year’s Day. Mr. Cohen is the general manager for Bob Capes Realtors® of the nationally recognized Century 21® group. Although they were already South Carolina residents, Mr. Cohen says, “There is no question Greenville is a great place to live.

"The city has so much to offer. The schools are great … we have excellent healthcare … there is tremendous variety in sporting events with college games, the Greenville Drive (pro baseball), museums, symphony, ballet and other performing arts.” Because the family had lived in Columbia (near Lake Murray), prior to a move to Myrtle Beach, they enjoy boating. “Already, we’re enjoying the restful waters of Lake Hartwell and the other enthusiasts we’ve met there,” he says. Like Ms. Campbell, they enjoy weekend walks along the Reedy River.
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Center for Carolina Living Mr. Cohen says his family finds the pedestrian bridge intriguing, while Ms. Campbell prefers long walks along the park’s winding foot trail with Otis, her basset hound/golden retriever mix. Center for Carolina Living
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In addition, she finds respite from the day-to-day demands of work to share fun activities with residents and staff members. She keeps up to the mental and physical challenges of the job by staying fit and developing stamina and fitness from lifting weights at a local gym. “Shooting the rapids on the Chattooga (river) is one of my all-time favorite things to do,” she says. Other times, she scouts area shops, searching for antiques to decorate her bungalow in the historic Augusta Road area.

The Cohens were both established professionally in Myrtle Beach prior to moving to Greenville. He was transferred with his company, and Mrs. Cohen is carving out a niche for herself as branch manager of AAA Travel. Both know the importance of community involvement and volunteerism and, already, he is involved with the Greater Greenville Chamber of Commerce, Palmetto Health Baptist (in Easley), the Home Builders Association of Greenville, and the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS.® They have settled into their Simpsonville home on Greenville’s thriving Eastside. “We chose the Simpsonville area, not only because it is experiencing phenomenal residential, business and retail growth, but because it provides easier access to Capes’ Columbia headquarters. As far as we’re concerned, there is no better place to live,” Mr. Cohen says after a few months. One might speculate that he’s a native – and no longer a newcomer.
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Homefolks, newcomers and visitors have one word to describe activities in Greenville:

WOW! It doesn’t matter if they are drawn to sports, cultural activities, family festivals, sightseeing, or some other type of leisure event, all agree there is so much to see and even more to do.


Get Cultured
Metropolitan Arts Council (MAC)
The umbrella organization for every
discipline of the arts in Greenville, MAC is a 501(c) 3 organization providing funding for many of the visual and performing arts groups.
864.467.3132.
www.greenvillearts.com

Greenville Symphony
Under the direction of Edvard Tchevzel, the organization provides education and cultural opportunities to residents through the presentation of live orchestral music.
864.232.0344.
www.greenvillesymphony.org


What to do & What to see
The Peace Center for the Performing Arts
It was built in 1990 at a cost of $42 million and is recognized as one of the acoustically-superior venues in the nation. The Peace Center Concert Hall seats 2,100 visitors, and the Gunter Theatre seats 430.
864.467.3000.
www.peacecenter.org

SC Children’s Theatre
In its eighteenth year of bringing quality children’s theatre to life, the venue produces well-known stories such as Jack and the Beanstalk, The Wizard of Oz, Aladdin and more.
864.235.2885.
www.scchildrenstheatre.org

Greenville Little Theatre (GLT)
Greenville’s first downtown theatre for the performing arts, this classic, small theatre launched Joanne Woodward’s acting career. GLT produces six shows per year, including musicals, mysteries and drama, as well as an annual Christmas show.
864.233.6238.
www.greenvillelittletheatre.com

Warehouse Theatre
This community-based, professional theatre presents high quality and diverse productions, trains professionals in the art of acting, and provides community outreach.
864.235.6948.
www.warehousetheatre.com

BI-LO Center
The Center hosts top-name entertainers, circuses and wrestling, as well as local and traveling exhibits.
864.233.2525.
www.bilocenter.com

The Pavilion
The Greenville County Recreational District’s multi-use venue features the area’s only indoor ice skating rink, as well as inline skating, tennis, soccer, a playground and miniature train.
864.288.6470.
www.gcrd.org

Calling all Sports Fans
West End Field
In the historic West End District (and covering an entire city block), the new state-of-the-art diamond and stands were completed in time for the 2006 season for the Greenville Drive baseball team. West End has become another centerpiece of downtown and the team is part of the South Atlantic League and a member of the Red Sox organization.
864.240.4500.
www.greenvilledrive.com

Museums
Greenville County Museum of Art
Greenville philanthropists Holly and Arthur McGill purchased the famed Andrew Wyeth Collection of paintings and donated them to the Museum. This one-of-a-kind collection can be seen any time, along with a Southern collection of American art from Colonial times to the present. It also features contemporary art and an art school.
864.271.7570.
www.greenvillemuseum.org

Bob Jones Art Museum
This faith-based university has one of the most prestigious collections of religious art and furniture in the world. It is revered for its Rembrandt collection and works by other well-known classical painters.
864.770.1331.
www.bju.edu

History Museum of Upcountry South Carolina
This museum was recently constructed to provide touch-screen technology that takes visitors back in time to see events and ideas that shaped the state. 864.467.3101.
www.upcountryhistory.org


Food, Glorious Food
Larkins on the River
At the Peace Center, enjoy a dinner of prime beef or fresh seafood before the theatre, or perhaps a cup of coffee, dessert or nightcap following the
performance.
864.467.9777.
www.larkinsontheriver.com

Devereaux’s
Savor gourmet cuisine that would tickle the most discriminating palates. Unique menus change frequently and the renovated brick structure provides a charming atmosphere.
864.241.3030.
www.devereauxsdining.com

Restaurant O
Join family, friends and colleagues for continental American food with a taste of Southern hospitality, served in a cosmopolitan atmosphere. 864.331.0007.
www.restauranto.com
 

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Katherine O. Pettit has worked as a writer, magazine editor, printer and public relations consultant. The Columbia resident has published more than 250 articles in magazines and newspapers. Her writing explores a variety of subjects including travel, lifestyles, business and management.

Aida Rogers
is a veteran writer and editor, having worked in newspapers, television, magazines and legal newsletters. She is coauthor of Stop Where the Parking Lot's Full, a collection of writings about South Carolina's most beloved restaurants. She recently won second place in the 2010 Green Eyeshade Awards (feature writing, non-daily print category.

Garnette Bane,
owner and CEO of Garnette Bane & Associates, LLC, has a diverse background, ranging from broadcast and print journalism to healthcare, marketing, advertising and public relations. A member of the Society of Professional Journalists, she is the author of In My Wildest Dreams, the autobiography of J. Floyd Hall, Ed. D., a former Greenville County Superintendent of Schools, and has been published and recognized for her writing in Virginia, South Carolina and nationally. In 2004, she researched and wrote The Upstate Report for Attaché, U. S. Airways' in-flight magazine.


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