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coastal towns

Beaufort, SC

Bluffton, SC

Brunswick Islands, NC

Charleston & its Resort Islands, SC

Conway, SC

Currituck, NC

Edisto Island, SC

Georgetown, SC

Hardeeville, SC

Hilton Head Island, SC

Jasper County, SC

Mount Pleasant, SC

North Myrtle Beach, SC

Myrtle Beach, SC

Northeast NC: Edenton, New Bern, Elizabeth City, Hertford

Outer Banks, NC

Pawleys Island/Litchfield, SC

Savannah, GA

Southport, NC

Summerville, SC

Walterboro, SC

Washington, NC

Whiteville, NC

Wilmington, NC

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Savannah
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Center for Carolina Living Can it get any more gorgeous? We don’t think so. For a dreamy setting, visit Forsyth Park in Savannah, with its central fountain, huge live oaks and historic monuments. Concerts in the fall make the package complete.
Photo courtesy of Savannah Convention & Visitors Bureau
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Savannah, Georgia
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ne of the first things you must decide before moving to Savannah is in what century you wish to reside. Perhaps the 18th or 19th, as represented by an imposing restored mansion overlooking a grassy square filled with live oaks.

Or, perhaps the 21st is your century of choice, and you would choose one of the newer ultra-planned communities like Westbrook, with a Greg Norman golf course, a private entrance to a convenient boutique-style shopping village, and lots of space between you and your neighbor.

Think of Savannah as sort of a user-friendly time machine that lets you pick between an arts and crafts bungalow in Ardsley Park and a home on a nearby island.

Howard and Pat Hackney lived in Savannah at The Landings on Skidaway Island for 20 years before moving to Metamora, about 40 miles north of Detroit, for Mr. Hackney’s career in aviation.
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hey still have roots in Savannah, however, with a Tybee Island beach house, and soon, a Savannah-style home on Hutchinson Island, in the Reserve at Savannah Harbor.

“We watched the island for years in anticipation of what might be planned there,” Mrs. Hackney explained. “It has the amenities of a golf course community, and we can walk and ride bikes almost everywhere. When we want to go downtown for a concert or night out, we can hop on the water ferry and be there in minutes.”

The Hackneys will eventually retire back to Savannah, splitting time between their homes in Metamora and the Reserve. “When you return to a place you’ve lived before, you know it will never be the same,” she said. “But going to a new community in a familiar area gives you the best of both worlds. You are close to your friends but you’re also in a new environment. We think Savannah is such a wonderful city with its history and beauty, as well as what the community offers. Anywhere you travel, people know the town and are in awe of those who can actually live there.”

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Center for Carolina Living Their new home will include traditional Savannah architectural features such as side porches, long windows, shutters and more. It will fit right into the design of the Reserve, which is incorporating lots of green space to enjoy the outdoors.
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Savannah is Georgia’s first city, and the last of the 13 original colonies that made up this country. It has survived sieges, wars, plagues and hurricanes - actually not just survived, but thrived. The result is one of the country’s largest historic districts, complete with an impressive urban forest and a city plan that still works more than 250 years after it was conceived.

Around a core of preserved and restored history, Savannah has developed as a modern city with an emphasis on outdoor activities that take full advantage of the subtropical climate and mix of fresh and salt water. To this, the residents have added a patina of eccentricity, a strange mixture of conservatism and joie de vivre that outsiders found to be such fascinating reading in the recent bestseller, John Berendt’s Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.

Now, we’ll leave the separation of good and evil up to the eye of the beholder, but there’s no disputing the garden part. In addition to its famous urban forest, made up largely of live oaks which lose their leaves only when the new ones come out in spring, Savannah enjoys some definite Eden-like touches. The salt marshes make for breathtaking scenery as you make your way to the nearby barrier islands that flank the Georgia coast. Tybee Island is the area’s public beach, and visitors can turn their eyes toward the sea and watch the giant container ships coming and going to the Port of Savannah with the world’s goods aboard.

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Center for Carolina Living Savannah has always attracted visitors, but tourism on a scale large enough to be considered an industry is a relatively recent innovation. Its tourism charms can generally be grouped into two
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parts - the natural gifts, like its beaches and climate, and the gifts of the past, like the still-viable city plan, and the stately mansions which were spared the torches of the Civil War. The city has cashed in on its history, with historic mansions serving as house museums and their slightly younger cousins doing service as romantic B&Bs.

Because tourism is an element of a diverse local economy, rather than the dominant industry, Savannah has been spared the shrill, artificial atmosphere that sticks to areas overly dependent on courting the whims of vacationers. The result? A lovely place to call home, and one that welcomes guests with a graciousness born of long practice.
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Betty Darby is a graduate of the University of Georgia, where she majored in Journalism. She has divided her career between journalism and public relations, compiling 12 years with daily newspapers in Georgia, and another four with a business niche publication. A resident of Savannah for more than 20 years, she is assisted in her writing projects by Candler and Roadkill, two rescued stray cats who like to join her at the computer.

Katherine Pettit has worked as a writer, magazine editor, printer and public relations consultant. The Columbia resident has published more than 250 articles in magazines and newspapers. Her writing explores a variety of subjects including travel, lifestyles, business and management.  
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