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North Carolina Tax Summary
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orth Carolina, with miles of beaches and beautiful mountains, is one of the best and most attractive states in which to work, live and play. CNBC, Forbes, CEO Magazine and Site

Selection Magazine consistently rank the Tar Heel State as one of the best business climates in the nation. Governor Bev Perdue and her administration constantly push for state government to work better and more efficiently for businesses and families. One of the ways to do that is by making information about state government user friendly and easily accessible.

So here is some important information to help any new residents or business owners learn about filing and paying taxes in North Carolina.

The North Carolina Department of Revenue (NCDOR) provides a wide range of services that helps taxpayers find accurate and timely information about filing their taxes. The department’s convenient electronic services include filing taxes online, registering a new business and even the ability to check on your refund status on a mobile cellular device. All are flexible, safe and secure ways for the citizens of North Carolina to interact with the Department of Revenue.

Each year, electronic filing of taxes becomes increasingly popular. Electronic filing automatically computes figures and calculations, significantly reducing the chance of simple errors that can cause delays in processing. By filing electronically and choosing to have a direct deposit, taxpayers typically receive refunds sooner than those who file traditional paper returns.

Checking the status of your North Carolina refund is easy and fast using the “Where’s My Refund” button at www.dornc.com. Individuals can also pay their taxes, file for extensions and make estimated tax payments online. Business transactions can also be made through the department’s Website.

Center for Carolina LivingFor those looking for one-on-one assistance, NCDOR operates fully staffed service centers in Asheville, Charlotte, Durham, Elizabeth City, Fayetteville, Greensboro, Greenville, Hickory, Raleigh, Wilmington and Winston-Salem.

Taxes that affect most North Carolina residents – and that you want to be aware of – are income, sales and motor vehicle taxes. Here is some helpful information about each one.

Income taxes are due on your taxable earnings each year. The requirements for filing income tax returns in North Carolina are different from filing your federal taxes. Every NC resident whose income for the taxable year equals or exceeds the following amounts must file a state return: $5,500 for single taxpayers, $11,000 for those who are married and filing jointly, $2,500 for married taxpayers who file separately and $6,900 for those who file as a head of household.

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Sales taxes are due on purchases of most goods and services in North Carolina. The combined state and local sales tax rate is 6.75 percent in most counties. A few counties have a rate of 7 or 7.25 percent. To find the rate in your county, visit this site: www.dornc.com/taxes/sales/taxrates.html.

Items subject to sales tax are: tangible personal property, rental accommodations, charges for cleaning, pressing and laundering linens or apparel, certain other services and some digital property. Residents may also owe Use Tax, if they purchase any of the above-mentioned items outside of North Carolina but intend to use the product inside the state, or if they did not pay sales tax at the time of the purchase. Use taxes should be reported on the income tax return each year.

North Carolina has two sales tax holidays each year. The first is held in early August and is commonly known as the School Sales Tax Holiday that is designed to help families with their back-to-school shopping. The second is held in November and allows consumers to purchase certain Energy Star rated appliances and products without paying sales tax.

The state’s motor fuels tax is 35 cents per gallon.

North Carolina also collects a 3 percent Highway Use Tax on vehicles in lieu of a state sales tax on vehicles. The tax is assessed each time a title is transferred. Out-of-state residents who move to North Carolina pay the tax according to a value determined by the North Carolina Division of Motor Vehicles. If a sales tax or use tax was paid to a taxing jurisdiction outside North Carolina within 90 days of moving, credit may be allowed.

For more information, visit the Newcomer’s Guide on the Department of Motor Vehicles Website at: www.dmv.dot.state.nc.us/newcomersguide.

If you have questions or need more information about North Carolina taxes, please visit the Department of Revenue’s Website at www.dornc.com  or call 1.877.252.3052.

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